Chopsuey Cafe

Elisa:

Chopsuey Cafe is a classy, yet relaxing and inviting establishment – old-school gray and white marble tables adorned with glossy silver cutleries and white dishware that you would typically find in a regular Chinese restaurant. Juxtaposing this gorgeous black and white interior are amber dining chairs and leather maroon menus. The charming effect is completed with the giant vase of beautiful flowers – a unique feature that you would find in all PS Café restaurants.
Chopsuey Cafe is inspired by the fond memories of Westernized Chinese food of owners Peter Teo and Philip Chin. As such, the menu is a mix of classic American-Chinese dishes such as General Tso’s Chicken Drumlets and Sweet Corn & Fresh Egg Drop Soup, as well as contemporary interpretations such as Yam Truffle Ball and Twice Cooked Citrus & Spice Duck Leg or Grain Fed Beef Short Ribs.
However, this hottest addition to the Dempsey culinary scene by the PS Café group hasn’t received much positive reviews. In fact, it has only received a mere 3/5 stars from Singapore food critic Wong Ah Yoke. However, as huge fans of PS Café (my review on PS. Cafe Paragon, PS. Cafe Dempsey), my mum and I, against all odds, crossed our fingers and found our way to this colonial black and white house in the corner of Dempsey Hill one afternoon.
From the time we stepped in, we were treated like Kings and Queens. The host was friendly and cheerful, and service was impeccable. Waiters were interactive and knowledgeable, yet in no way arrogant. Again, a unique plus point for all PS Café restaurants.
 On with the food:
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The condiments tray was impressive with each sauce appetizing in its own ways.
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Scallop, Crab & Scallion Dumpling ($9). This took ages to arrive. Initially, the chef had forgotten our order. And when it was finally done, it was served to the wrong table. But the waiter was professional and quick to respond by having our dessert on the house (not to say that we should always get free food, but to say commend on the exceptional service and customer care). But anyways, the skin was thick and a little gummy. The filling on the other hand, was substantial and juicy and bursting with flavor that I didn’t even need soy sauce. However, priced at about 3 times the price of the regular Dim Sum you can find in your average Chinese restaurant, diners are definitely expecting something more than spectacular. Yet, I don’t think the Dim Sum here has managed to achieve that standard.
Char Siew Pau ($9). My mum asked the waiter, “How is your Char Siew Pau different from the rest?” He replied, “Both our buns and roast pork are homemade. The sauce is also not as sweet.” And so we decided to give it a try. Indeed, the pork was succulent and the sauce was delicious. It was more savory and not as sweet as your usual Char Siew Pau. The bun was just like the usual buns though. As much as I enjoyed it, maybe slightly more than the usual ones, definitely not worth $9.
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Crispy Duck Pow Pockets ($17): Shredded duck confit & pulled roasted pork filled soft white buns served with warm sweet bean sauce. This sounded like my favorite Kong Bak Pau, also known as Chinese Braised Pork Burgers, and I immediately knew that I had to get it. However, I felt that the buns were too thick and the fillings were stingy – only two thin slices of duck. Sigh L The crispy thingies on the top (I couldn’t figure out what it was, maybe the shredded duck confit) added a nice crunch though. Sad.
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Pumpkin Soup with Lobster ($16): This was a special of the day. We were definitely expecting something more substantial given the price. However, we were served a tiny little pumpkin with probably only one chunk of lobster and a few pieces of mushrooms. Bleh. What I love about this dish is that you could scoop the pumpkin out of its shell. And yes, I love pumpkin, but not enough to make me feel that my $16 bucks was worth it.
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Roasted Spring Chicken with Cinnamon 5 Spice Salt ($36): Spring chicken roasted golden and served with a sweet cinnamon & 5 spice salt. Now I think this is worth $36 bucks. Just look at that huge pile of meat lying in the center of a laaaaaarge handful of chips! The meat was moist and juicy and skin was crispy. One of the best roast chicken I’ve ever tasted. Add if you chose to add the salt, you will definitely be taken into another level of taste and flavor. Yumz.
IMG-20130418-WA016 Long Life Vegetable Noodle ($14): Wok fried fine wheat flour “Mi Swa” noodles with spinach, snap peas, beansprouts and radicchio. This was delicious and I love how the mixture of vegetables added both colour and crunch. You could choose to add beef short ribs for an additional $8, but we decided to let the vegetables shine on that day.
IMG-20130418-WA039 Don’t leave without order desserts! They have two full pages of desserts and is definitely worth the calories. Vietnamese Coffee Pudding ($14): A rich coffee pudding on an oreo base drizzled with condensed milk and crispy chocolate rice puffs. The coffee flavor in the silky pudding was distinct. And coupled with the crunchy oreo base, you’ve got a perfect dessert bite that is both irreplaceable in terms of taste and texture. It was just the right amount of sweetness, neither too sweet, nor overpowering in the coffee flavor. The chocolate rice puffs were unnecessary though in my opinion.
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IMG-20130418-WA050Last but not least, Fortune Cookies before we leave. I’ve always love fortune cookies, simply because there’s a little “fortune” inside that is always bound to make you feel excited – a piece of paper with words of wisdom or a vague prophecy. Well yes, even though these ones aren’t of any great meaning, the idea of giving diners Fortune Cookies is indeed a smart technique in emphasizing the Asian-ness in this restaurant. And it does bring back a lot of childhood memories too!
 Overall to be fair, Chopsuey isn’t a place for everyone. Taste-wise for example, my mum is a purist about Chinese cuisine and wasn’t quite convinced as much as I was to Chopsuey’s gourmet take on Anglicized Asian fare found in the West. Well, I love fusion – from American Japanese, Japanese Thai, Spanish American – anything! Yup. I like fusion. Also, dishes here are outlandish expensive for the portions and I wouldn’t say everything was worth it.
Reservations are a must! We were there for lunch and the place was extremely packed with ladies, mostly Caucasians. Well, turns out that it remains a hit for all our ladies.
Chopsuey Cafe
#01 – 23
Block 10
Dempsey Road
Tel: 9224 6611
http://chopsueycafe.com 
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This entry was posted in American/New American, Cafe, Chinese, Dessert, Dinner, Lunch, Quick/Easy, Vegetarian and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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